Intimate Partner Violence In Latina And Non

From , breast cancer mortality decreased by 40 percent due to improved breast cancer treatment and early detection . Since 1989, about 375,900 breast cancer deaths in U.S. women have been avoided . Mammography screening rates also fell somewhat during the early 2000s. However, studies show the decline in breast cancer incidence during this time was not likely due to the decline in screening rates [61-62]. Rates vary between women and men and among people of different ethnicities and ages.

Additionally, a study by the National Conference of State Legislatures estimates that up to half of Latino undergraduates’ parents have not received any postsecondary education. Many educational experts agree that parents without a college background are unable to adequately prepare their children for the rigorous academics and the social pressures of institutionalized higher education. “Without family background in the college experience,” the study notes, “these students may find it difficult to fully engage in college life, which can lead them to drop out and not complete a degree.”

With a national circulation of 150,000 and a readership of nearly 600,000, LATINA Style reaches both the seasoned professional and the young Latina entering the workforce for the first time. The culturally sensitive editorial environment we provide showcases Latina achievements in all areas, including business, science, civic affairs, education, entertainment, sports, and the arts. We also offer technology tips and reviews, entertainment reviews, travel recommendations, investment guidance, beauty tips, food and drink recipes, automotive updates, and career advice—in summary, all of the things that impact the quality of life.

Additionally, since the study ended in July 2017, more research is needed to determine whether a rise in preterm births among Latina women has persisted over the last two years. Women not born in the United States typically have lower rates of preterm birth compared with women born in the US, but Gemmill added that a drop in foreign-born women still does not explain the difference in male versus female preterm births. The study involved analyzing monthly data on preterm births in the United States from January 2009 through July 2017. The data, which included 32.9 million live births total, came from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WONDER online database.

All the while, policymakers must ensure that these apprenticeships continue to be paths to training while earning living wages. Because Hispanic women still face limited benefits in terms of the wage gap for getting a college education after graduating from high school, just encouraging higher education will not resolve the gender wage gap. The intersectional structural barriers faced by Hispanic women that lead to reduced wages affect both their own lifetime earnings, as well as the economic security of their families. Depressed labor force participation and work hours bring down earnings for individual Hispanic women workers and may also contribute to a more precarious and anti-competitive labor market for all workers.

Other Words From Latina

All birth count variables exhibited strong seasonality for male and female births. Consistent with convention,32 we therefore differenced the birth count series at 12 months to remove seasonality. Expected values were generated from a time series model using data from 94 months of the presidency of Barack Obama . The first 13 months of the expected values for male births and first 12 months for female births were lost to modeling.

Latinas hold only 7.4 percent of the degrees earned by women, though they constituted 16 percent of the female population in 2012. The level of educational attainment for Latinas has risen in the past few years, yet it still sits at a level significantly lower than that of white women. Latina women experienced higher rates of human papillomavirus, or HPV, than white women as of 2010 and twice the death rate from cervical cancer. Seventeen percent of Latina women receive Medicaid, compared to 9 percent for white women. Hypertension is slightly less prevalent among Latina women, at 29 percent, than among white women, at 31 percent.

The breast cancer incidence rate among women in 2009 was 131 and the estimated breast cancer incidence rate in 2016 was also 131 . This means there were 131 breast cancer cases per 100,000 women in the U.S. population in both time periods.

Not only do Hispanic/Latina women have lower utilization of screening mammography, but many also delay following up on abnormal screening tests. The resulting delay in the treatment of breast cancer in Hispanic/Latina women affects the prognosis. With time, tumors become larger and are more likely to spread to other areas of the body, requiring more extensive treatment and making them more difficult to eradicate.

There’s still much to learn about the risk of breast cancer in transgender people. If you are transgender, talk with your health care provider about your risk of breast cancer. Transgender women had a much lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population, but a higher risk than men in the general population. Transgender men had a much lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population, but a higher risk than men in the general population. Hispanic/http://cprajsamand.in/the-best-approaches-to-use-jamaican-women-at-home/ tend to be diagnosed with later stage breast cancers than non-Hispanic white women .

In 2012, the poverty rate for Latina women overall was 27.9 percent, compared with the rate for non-Hispanic white women at 10.8 percent. The number of working-poor Latina women is more than double that of white women, at 13.58 percent, compared with 6.69 percent. According to a 2010 study, the median household wealth of single Latina women is $120, compared with single white women’s median household wealth of $41,500. Latina women make disproportionately less than their male and non-Hispanic white counterparts. These disparities are leaving a growing portion of our population more vulnerable to poverty and its implications.

Comparatively, female business owners as a whole only increased by 20% during this same time period. These wage gaps in the workforce affect Latinas at every socioeconomic status, not just the working class. Latina women are the most likely group to be paid at or below the minimum wage, with 5.7% of wage and salary workers earning this amount.

White women were 93 percent as likely as women in the general population to live 5 years beyond diagnosis. For those diagnosed from , the 5-year relative survival rate for breast cancer among Black women was 83 percent compared to 93 percent among white women . Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates are lower for Asian and Pacific Islander women than for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women . Five-year breast cancer-specific survival shows the percentage of people who have not died from breast cancer 5 years after diagnosis. Some people have metastatic breast cancer when they are first diagnosed .

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research explains the workings of organizations aimed to support the struggles of Latina immigrants. The IWPR states that growing organizations are currently providing English tutors and access to education. Programs specifically for Latina immigrants now use an adaptation tactic of teaching, rather than an assimilation ideology to help this population adjust to American life. Programs like these include Casa Latina Programs, providing education on English, workers’ rights, and the consumer culture of America. Of the Latinas participating in the labor force, 32.2% work in the service sector, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Age and family structure play important roles in women’s labor force participation, as well as employment opportunities. Mora and Dávila also find significant differences based on the generation of immigration. Currently, there are limited resources for Latina immigrants in the United States. As explained in Motivations of Immigration, many women come to the United States for a better education, among other factors.

Here, we provide a full description of risk factors that might be associated with the high prevalence of the triple-negative subtype in Latina women. We assessed demographic , modifiable , and nonmodifiable risk factors.